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THE HOUSE OF SPEAKEASY IS A HOME FOR CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF A LITERARY KIND: A PLACE WHERE AUTHORS AND THEIR AUDIENCES COME TOGETHER IN INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINING WAYS. MORE

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November 1 | 7 pm | Razor’s Edge

“A literary mixtape [with] perfect flow and variety.”
– The New York Times

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Wise folk say the path to salvation is hard. We won’t disagree but we will dare you to join us as the House of SpeakEasy passes boldly over the Razor’s Edge.

 

Only the best make the cut at New York’s sharpest literary cabaret. Poet and Pulitzer Prize finalist Elizabeth Alexander will give us The Light of the World while National Book Award winner Phil Klay reveals the writer’s secret weapon. Best-selling author James Rebanks will give us The Shepherd’s View and Man Booker Prize-shortlisted Madeleine Thien will show us both sides of the blade. We don’t like to be blunt, but do book early.

Seriously Entertaining Upcoming Shows
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ALL 2016 SHOWS HELD AT JOE’S PUB at The Public Theater at 425 Lafayette St, NYC 10003. If a show is sold out, check our website again in a few days, as extra tickets sometimes become available closer to show date. Join our mailing list for further information. You can buy tickets to our September season premiere or to any and all of the fall shows by clicking here.

11.1.16 RAZOR’S EDGE
12.6.16 AIDING AND ABETTING

JOIN THE HOUSE OF SPEAKEASY FAMILY!

ENJOY DISCOUNTED TICKETS, SPECIAL INVITATIONS, AND TAKE YOUR
BOOKS TO AND FRO IN OUR DISTINCTIVE SPEAKEASY TOTE BAG.

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FIND OUT MORE

SEE PHOTOS OF OUR JUNE 13TH SHOW
THE SPEAKEASY BLOG
by Charles Arrowsmith

The Eye of the Blackbird

Thirteen Ways of Looking
Colum McCann
Random House, 2015; 256pp

The first words we read in Colum McCann’s 2015 collection of stories are Wallace Stevens’s: “Among twenty snowy mountains / The only moving thing / Was the eye of the blackbird.” Stevens’s poem “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” provides the epigraphs for each of the short chapters in McCann’s title story, and an oblique way in to understanding its philosophical intricacies. Its haiku-like fragments dictate the reader’s focus in ways that are continually refreshing and unexpected: “The river is moving,” he writes; “The blackbird must be flying.” “When the blackbird flew out of sight / It marked the edge / Of one of many circles.” In the same way that Stevens’s blackbird is often just glimpsed, the tiniest of details in the vastness of nature, so McCann draws attention to the poetic detail at the edge of the frame, the impulse or act that might hold the key to explaining a significant event. The event in question is the apparently random murder of an 82-year-old judge yards from his home on the Upper East Side. The story, suspended between the judge’s interior life and the geometry of his murder, captured obliquely by a singleSee More >

WE SERIOUSLY LIKE
  1. Art, activism, and the Black American writer: Toni Morrison, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Sonia Sanchez on dismantling power through writing.
  2. The case for Barnes & Noble: why the corporate behemoth is an agent for intellectual and cultural growth.
  3. Craving, tasting, devouring: the ancient use of eating/reading imagery in literary discourse.
  4. An ode to Lois Duncan and her female protagonists: the thrilling, heartbreaking, and influential storytelling of the late writer.
  5. Reading (and telling) in translation: the rich, creative journey of Knausgaard translator Don Bartlett.
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